Back to the Past: A Trip to the Museum of the Filipino People

“Free” is such an inviting word.

That’s why my friends and I didn’t miss the chance to explore the National Museum of the Philippines last October, as the said museum opened its doors for free the whole month for its celebration of the National Museum Week.

Museum of the Filipino People located along Finance Road in Manila

My friends and I were lucky that despite our busy schedules, we were able to visit on the last Sunday of the month. And though not everyone in our little circle was present, it was nevertheless a fun-filled educational day for us as we got to bond, laugh, and learn more about our country all at the same time.

My friends and I smiled at the camera as the elevator transported us to the higher floors of the museum.

The museum actually has two buildings, one is the National Art Gallery in P. Burgos St, Manila that houses sculptures and paintings from the famous artists of the country, and the other is the Museum of the Filipino People along Finance Road, Manila, which is a trip to the Philippine history since it is the archaeology and anthropology branch of the museum. We didn’t get to see the former since it was already near closing time when we finished our tour to the latter, and besides… The real reason is that I didn’t know there are two buildings until I started writing this entry (Hohoho! My ever-so honest self strikes again! 😀 ).

On regular days, the museum charges 30 pesos for students, 100 pesos for adults, and 80 pesos for senior citizens. The fee is very affordable, so if you missed going to this museum in October, it’s still worth it if you’ll pay on your visit to it. In fact, I think it’s a lot better to go to it on a regular day.

There were many off-limits rooms with “Temporarily Closed” signs on their doors. Maybe those rooms were being renovated, like with the National Art Gallery in August and September, or maybe that’s all people can get for free. Through the elevator, the fifth floor would even greet visitors with darkness and the same signage. I didn’t read the details, but whatever the reason, I think it’s good that the museum left something people can be curious about and make them come back some other time.

Anyway, I will only post the photos of my favorites in the exhibits. Just like the museum, I’m also merely giving you a glimpse of what’s inside it. It’s really much better if you’ll see it for yourself.

The Ifugao House

One of the things that people may immediately see on the first floor of the Museum of the Filipino People and even while in one of the elevators is the real Ifugao house, which is amid the green grasses and trees in the courtyard.

Since people can freely move inside and out the hut, it is almost never vacant. That’s why we decided to take a tour around the building first before re-visiting it for some photos. Good thing we got it all to ourselves the second time we came near it.

The miniature model of the Ifugao House inside the museum.

An Ifugao House located at the courtyard of the museum where visitors can experience how the hut looks and feels like inside and out.

This is how the hut looks like inside. 🙂

Welcome! Welcome! The house itself is elevated and people can enter through climbing a ladder.

Fascination with Crabs

Crabs are one of my favorite sea creatures because they’re just so delicious, especially their eggs. And though the ones in the museum aren’t edible at all–they may even be deadly–they were still apples in my eyes which led me into taking snapshots of some of them, no matter how scary they look.

Spiny Spooner

Rock Crab

Giant Spider Crab

Sleepy Sponge Crab

Red Frog Crab

Long-Armed Crab

How and Where They Found It

Isn’t it interesting how archaeologists were able to gather those treasures we appreciate in museums? The National Museum has miniature re-enactments of how these hardworking people retrieved artifacts that helped us Filipinos know our beginnings.

Old, big, and scary jars which reminded us of the 1986 film Halimaw sa Banga.

This is how some of the old jars were recovered by archaeologists.

Second burial artifacts

Discovery of ancient burial jars in caves. The shape is an indicator if the remains inside a jar belonged to a male or a female–a woman’s has breasts on it.

Other Interesting Creatures and Relics

Visiting museums are worth it. We get to see replicas, miniature re-enactments and models, preserved bodies of animals, and more, which give us more insights about the things in the past and those we co-exist with. Below are still some of the photos that caught my attention.

Replica of a cave with stalactites

Borak

Woods that look more like stones

Winged Fruits which reminded me of the Golden Snitch

Eagle

Grasshoppers

Butterflies

Photo opportunity with butterflies 🙂

Sea Plants

Coral

It was a big and scary starfish

 

Manila Day Out

Manila is quite far from us, people from other parts of the metro. With that, we didn’t go straight home after our little educational tour. Instead, we went to other parts of Manila to make the most of the day.

My friends posed for the camera while buying some dirty ice cream in Rizal Park.

Eating didn’t stop for me with dirty ice cream. I craved for green mangoes when I saw them and bought one for 15 pesos. “Look at the camera, Manong!” 🙂

Dinner at The Sicillian Pizza, Dapitan St, Sampaloc, Manila, A. K. A. My Territory since the street is located near my college building at the University of Santo Tomas. Because of that, I led the way from the Rizal Park to this place. hehe

Since we were already around UST, we decided to go inside for a short cut to our last destination. Of course, the experience wouldn’t be complete without a photo or two with these three famous letters. 🙂

These two big A and B letters weren’t existing yet when I left UST. So although I was a mere silhouette because of the time of the day, and I’m Bachelor of Arts holder, I took the chance and had a photo with them. 🙂

Last stop for the day: My friend’s family condominium unit along Espana, Manila.

It was a tiring yet fulfilling day! You should visit the National Museum, too! 🙂

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